There is a need for forging consensus for national security architecture to disarm and reintegrate revolutionary brigades to deal with cases of conflict-related detainees: Masood Khan

There is a need for forging consensus for national security architecture to disarm and reintegrate revolutionary brigades to deal with cases of conflict-related detainees: Masood Khan

Islamabad, November 08, 2012 (PPI-OT): Pakistan’s Permanent Representative to the UN, Ambassador Masood Khan, while speaking in the Security Council on the situation in Libya underlined the need for forging consensus for national security architecture to disarm and reintegrate the revolutionary brigades, to deal with cases of conflict-related detainees and to contain the adverse impact of weapons proliferation, says a press release received here today from New York.

The Security Council held its meeting on Wednesday to consider the fourth Report of the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court on implementation of Council resolution 1970 on the situation in Libya.

Expressing Pakistan’s fullest support for the well-being and prosperity of the people of Libya, Ambassador Masood congratulated the Libyan people on the elections and the formation of a new government, adding that this would mark an important step towards the recovery and rehabilitation of the country from the conflict of last year. “The path ahead for Libya is reconciliation, not retribution”, he said.

He expressed confidence that despite daunting challenges ahead, the new elected government, with the broad support of the Libyan people, would be able to overcome these challenges. The international community, he said must continue to extend all possible assistance in this regard.

Regarding trial of Saif Al-Islam Gaddafi and Abdullah Al-Senussi by Libyan Courts, the Ambassador hoped that the request of the Libyan authorities to try these individuals would be considered positively in accordance with the complementary nature of the Court’s jurisdiction. “The Libyan government must also ensure that trials of these individuals, if conducted in Libya, would be in accordance with due process and Libya’s international obligations”, he added.

On other alleged crimes committed in Libya, he underlined the importance of conducting thorough and impartial investigations regardless of which side was accused of committing them. “Formulation of a comprehensive justice strategy to address crimes that occurred in Libya would underpin efforts to ensure peace and stability in the country”.

He appreciated the engagement of the Libyan government in the judicial process at the International Criminal Court (ICC). “Sharing information about its legal system with the Court would strengthen its position on the admissibility challenge’, he added.

The Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, Fatou Bensouda, told the 15-member Council that ICC encourages the new Libyan government, to ensure that there was no amnesty for international crimes and no impunity for crimes, regardless of who was the perpetrator and who was the victim. She called the Libyan’s authorities to ensure that justice is served in relation to any crimes committed during the overthrow of the regime of former leader Muammar al-Qadhafi.

“Working together, we can help address threats to Libya’s security, both from within and outside, that have been created by past and ongoing criminality, and demonstrate to the Libyan people that the world is committed to assisting them in their efforts to secure justice and lasting peace,” said Fatou Bensouda, while presenting ICC’s fourth report.

Pakistan is not a signatory to the Rome Statute and thus it is not a member of the International Criminal Court. However, Pakistan recognizes the rights and obligations of the States that are members of the ICC.

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